The Daughter of the Snows

Ballet fantastique in three acts
Music by Ludwig Minkus

World Première
19th January [O.S. 7th January] 1879
Imperial Bolshoi Kamenny Theatre, Saint Petersburg

Original 1879 Cast
The Daughter of the Snows
Ekaterina Vazem

The Captain
Pavel Gerdt

A vessel heading to the North Pole has become trapped by the Spirit of the Cold. He lures the travelers into his kingdom, where the ship’s captain falls in love with the Daughter of the Snows. She is, however, as cold as ice and pays no heed to his declarations of love. When the captain comes to his sense, he remembers his ship and his bride and he and his crew strive to return home, but snow and all manner of obstacles hinder them. To save the crew, the captain sacrifices himself to the Spirit of the Cold and finds himself again in the power of the Daughter of the Snows. The heavens clear, the goddess of summer and love approaches the captain and warms him. Winter becomes summer and the Daughter of the Snows becomes a snowdrop. But the Spirit of the Cold reappears and snow, ice and gloom return. The captain falls lifeless to the ground; the Daughter of the Snows has been his undoing.

The Daughter of the Snows was inspired by the enthusiasm that greeted Baron Nordenskjöld’s Arctic expedition of 1878-79, which opened the North-East passage and was a major development for Russia, both politically and economically. Taking inspiration from Scandinavian folklore and legends, the ballet contained Scandinavian dances in the first act – Celtringers, the dance of the Northern Gypsies; Norwegian wedding dance. The second act, in which the ship crew have been lured into the Land of the Snows, contained the Dance of the Migratory Birds, the appearance of the Daughter of the Snows in an adage and a Dance of the Snowflakes. The third act was devoted to Love and Rebirth, with dances for the flowers.

The Daughter of the Snows was premièred on the 19th January [O.S. 7th January] 1879 at the Imperial Bolshoi Kamenny Theatre. The ballet was met with enthusiasm and was staged again on the 28th January as a benefit for Petipa when he was presented with a silver tankard and tray.


Did you know?

  • The most well known passage in The Daughter of the Snows was its Dance of the Snowflakes, an idea that was revived in Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker.



  • Letellier, Robert Ignatius (2008) The Ballets of Ludwig MinkusCambridge Scholars Publishing